Tag Archives: MSUM

Enjoy National Trails Day on June 2, 2018

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Saturday, June 2 is National Trails Day! There are multiple activities that many people enjoy while on the trails including hiking, biking, bird watching, geocaching, and horseback riding. Which activity will you choose to celebrate this day?

The Fargo-Moorhead area is a great place to explore. It is covered in trails! While many of these trails aren’t your traditional hiking trails, you can still enjoy them! Some places you may want to check out include Gooseberry Mound Park and M.B. Johnson Park. Check out the links below to find some trails and parks near you!

 

Before you head out on the trails, make sure you are prepared:

  • proper footwear: trail shoes or hiking boots
  • map: even though we have easy access to GPS on our phones, bring a map just in case!
  • food and water: granola bars and trail mix work great! Bring extra food and water just in case your outing is longer than expected
  • rain gear and extra clothing: be prepared for anything! We live in an area where the weather can be unpredictable
  • first aid kit
  • sunscreen, sunglasses, hat

The American Hiking Society has great resources including hiking etiquette and how to prepare for any length of an outing on the trail. Check out their website if you would like more information.

In the end, it does not matter which activity you choose to do while celebrating National Trails Day, just get out and enjoy nature!

 

Sources: https://americanhiking.org/hiking-resources/#hiking-101

http://holidayinsights.com/moreholidays/June/national-trails-day.htm

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“Don’t Fry Day” is May 25th

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The sun is out and the temperature is rising! People are escaping the indoors to enjoy some time outside such as in the backyard, at the baseball field, or at the lake. Will you be doing the any of these? Whatever activity it is that you participate in, how do you protect yourself from the sun? Friday, May 25th is “Don’t Fry Day” and brings awareness to protecting our bodies from skin cancer.

Did you know that skin cancer is the most common and most preventable cancer out there? Skin cancer is caused by being exposed to ultraviolet (UV) rays. Where do UV rays come from? The sun and tanning beds both expose our skin to these types of rays. It is important to take precautionary measures to protect ourselves from them. Read the following bullet points for some tips to decrease your risk of skin cancer!

  • Spend your time outside in the shade, especially between 10a and 2p when the UV rays are strongest.
  • Wear clothing that covers your arms and legs
  • Wear a wide brim hat and sunglasses
  • Apply sunscreen at least every two hours and after you towel off or get out of the water
  • Avoid tanning beds!

UV rays from the sun can start causing damage to your skin in as little as 15 minutes. Even when it’s cloudy you still need to protect yourself. Keep an eye out for signs of skin cancer such as a new growth, sore that doesn’t heal, or change in a mole.  The CDC has also posted a list of traits that may increase the risk of skin cancer:

  • A lighter natural skin color.
  • Family history of skin cancer.
  • A personal history of skin cancer.
  • Exposure to the sun through work and play.
  • A history of sunburns, especially early in life.
  • A history of indoor tanning.
  • Skin that burns, freckles, reddens easily, or becomes painful in the sun.
  • Blue or green eyes.
  • Blond or red hair.
  • Certain types and a large number of moles.

Even if you don’t have these traits, you can still get skin cancer. If you notice any changes in your skin, contact your doctor! Keep your body healthy and safe this summer by protecting it from the sun’s harmful rays!

 

Sources:

https://www.cdc.gov/cancer/dcpc/resources/features/skincancer/index.htm

http://www.shieldhealthcare.com/community/news/2012/05/25/dont-fry-day-a-message-from-the-national-council-on-skin-cancer-prevention/

“Flat, Fast & Friendly” – Fargo Marathon 2018

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Yesterday marked the beginning of a week of fun and fitness. It’s marathon week here in Fargo-Moorhead! The Fargo Marathon is in its 14th year and has events for all! Registration is now closed but all are welcome to cheer the participants on! Here is a list of the events for the week:

Monday: Cylcothon

Tuesday: Furgo Dog Run

Thursday: Youth Run

Friday: 5K

Saturday: Relay, Marathon, Half Marathon, 10K

For more details about the Fargo Marathon, visit their website at fargomarathon.com.

The first marathon was held in 1886. At this time, the distance was 24.8 miles. In 1921, the distance was changed to 26.2. There aren’t too many marathon runners out there. About 0.5% of the population in the U.S. has run and completed a marathon. As we all may know, running a marathon takes a lot of training and energy. The average completion time is 4-5 hours. That is a lot of running! A 150 pound person may burn around 2600 calories during their marathon run, so it is important for them to fuel up and hydrate accordingly. What you may not know is the process of “tapering.” This is when a runner gradually decreases the intensity of their workouts as their event gets near. Runners will also participate in carbohydrate loading, which is the process of increasing their carbohydrate intake in the few day prior to their event. As you can see, running a marathon takes great physical and mental strength as well as proper nutrition. Take some time out of your day to cheer on all of the runners participating this week! They have trained very hard to get to where they are!

 

Sources:

http://fargomarathon.com/

http://www.marathontrainingschedule.com/blog/marathon-facts/

Congratulations to SNHL Grads!

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The time that many students have been looking forward to has finally come! After hours of hard work, graduation is finally in sight! The School of Nursing and Healthcare Leadership would like to congratulate all of our students who will be graduating this spring and summer. Commencement will be held on Friday, May 11, 2018 at 2:00pm at Nemzek Fieldhouse.

Here is the complete list of both ceremonies:

Morning Ceremony (10 AM)
College of Arts, Media and Communication
College of Business and Innovation
College of Humanities and Social Sciences
Graduate Studies

Afternoon Ceremony (2 PM)
College of Education and Human Services
College of Science, Health and the Environment
Graduate Studies

If you are unable to attend but would like to watch the ceremonies, use the link below to watch the live stream.

https://www.kaltura.com/index.php/extwidget/preview/partner_id/1192771/uiconf_id/39280822/entry_id/1_utleekcm/embed/auto?&flashvars%5BstreamerType%5D=auto

 

National Nurses Week! Thank A Nurse Today!

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This year National Nurses’ Week is from Sunday, May 6th through Saturday, May 12th. This week is dedicated to acknowledging and honoring nurses for all of their hard work and dedication. The week starts on May 6th, which is National Nurses Day and ends on May 12, which is International Nurses Day. Nurses are essential in delivering the high quality of patient care. This is a great opportunity to recognized the amazing work that they do. Take time this week and every week to thank a nurse for all of their amazing dedication and work that they do.

 

https://www.nursingworld.org/~490a9b/globalassets/education–events/national-nurses-week/ana_nnw2018_logo_color.

Fargo-Moorhead Event on March 21! Keeping Tech/Social Media Positive & Healthy

Cyber Bulling statistics show that over half of teens have been bullied online and have engaged in cyber bulling. They also show that more than 1 in 3 teens have experienced cyber threats online. Come join Professor Dave Eisenmann on March 31st for a presentation for parents and students about keeping technology and social media positive and healthy for students of all ages.  This is a FREE event and is open to the community. Eisenmann will be giving the presentation from 7PM-8:30PM at the First Lutheran Church in Fargo. This presentation will cover topics about cyber bullying and harassment, sexting, and the dangers of pornography. Why students should be careful about information that they share online through Instagram, Snapchat, and Twitter and how this a permanent digital record will also be covered in the presentation by Eisenmann. Attend this event to help students all ages understand how to keep their technology and social media positive and healthy.

For more information about this event click here:

http://y94.com/events/event/community/27230/keeping-techsocial-media-positive-healthy/

 

http://www.bullyingstatistics.org/content/cyber-bullying-statistics.html

https://makeawebsitehub.com/social-media-sites/

Poison Prevention Week 2018

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2016 statistics show that there is an average of 1 poison exposure reported to U.S. poison control centers every 14.6 seconds. Fortunately, not all reported incidents resulted in an actual poisoning. Do you know how to avoid a poisoning incident or what to do in the case a possible poisoning does occur? The Health Resources and Services Administration has dedicated March 15-21 as Poison Prevention Week to bring awareness. Read on to learn more about poison prevention and care.

  • A good start to preparing for or handling a poison incident is to have the Poison Help line written in a convenient location. That number is 1-800-222-1222. Keep the number in your phone and have a magnet on your fridge.
  • Poison proof your home. Keep medications in properly labeled containers and stored appropriately. Have properly functioning carbon monoxide detectors near bedrooms and furnaces. Keep cleaning supplies in proper containers and out of reach of children. Keep an eye on children when they are using craft supplies that may be made with chemicals and wash all surfaces after contact with the supplies. Use proper food preparation and storage techniques such as washing hands before handling food and storing foods at proper temperatures. Know what animals, insects, and plants are in your area that may be poisonous such as snakes and mushrooms.
  • What do you do if you suspect a possible poisoning? Do your best to stay calm and call the Poison Help line. Doing so may save you a trip to the Emergency Room. However, if the person is not breathing you must call 911. When you call the help line, an expert will be able to help you by giving first aid advice. If the poison was inhaled, get fresh air immediately. If the poison came in contact with the body, take off clothing that has been touched by the poison and rinse the skin with running water for 15-20 minutes. If the poison in in the eyes, rinse the eyes with running water for 15-20 minutes.

Being aware of possible poisoning incidents will help you be better prepared when a real incident occurs. Know what materials and organisms may be putting you at risk. Finally, if an incident does occur, do not wait for signs of a poisoning to call for help.

 

https://poisonhelp.hrsa.gov/what-can-you-do/raise-awareness-about-the-poison-help-line/index.html

https://www.poison.org/poison-statistics-national

https://www.motivators.com/blog/2015/02/raising-awareness-national-poison-prevention-week/