Monthly Archives: March 2017

Celebration of Nations and the Woodlands and High Plains Powwow Tomorrow, April 1st 2017

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“A traditional powwow is a time to celebrate and renew friendships. In addition, this powwow celebrates the educational experiences of American Indian higher education and the sharing of tribal cultures in the FM area.”

This year is the 28th annual Woodlands and High Plains Powwow. The Powwow is held at Nemzek from 1 to 9 tomorrow. The powwow will have a variety of dancing and drum songs from the area tribes. The community is encouraged to come and enjoy the cultural display and learn. In addition to the music and dancing there will be a hand games tournament and many vendors selling wares from their tribes.

The Celebration of Nations will also be held in the CMU tomorrow. Students and community members from cultures around the world will be here to get together. The celebration is kicked off with a parade of flags. Following that, students will have cooked some of their meals from home that are available to sample with dancing and music being played at this time. The celebration will end after a fashion show highlighting the dress and attire from around the world.

Celebration of Nations

Woodland and High Prairie Powwow

 

Dragon Athletics Spring 2017

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The MSUM wrestling team has excelled this year, but one teammate in particular stood out. Blake Bosch is a senior here at MSUM and he has been put on quite a few good matches this year at the NCAA Championships. He took 2nd place at the Championship this year and won  the All-American Honors for the third year in a row. He will be graduate this year, and he leaves a great legacy as a student athlete at MSUM. He is leaving with the second best record in MSUM history (115-35).

The men’s basketball team also has a good season. This was their 4th consecutive 20+ win season, with a record of 24-6. In addition to the that streak, they won their  fourth straight NSIC North Division Championship and a third straight NCAA Tournament!

The Women’s Basketball team had a great season this year finishing at 24-5. They won the NSIC Conference Tournament against Southwest State, but sadly lost the NCAA regionals to Central Missouri. This was the team’s first time making it to regionals since 2009. Dragon Women’s Basketball Head Coach, Carla Nelson, celebrated a feat this year. Coach Nelson achieved her 300th team win as a head college basketball coach.  Both Men’s and Women’s Basketball had great seasons and we look forward to next year!

The Women’s tennis team is off to a good start with a record of 9-5. Their next match will be at Bemidji State on April 1st. Be sure to show your support by cheering them on!

Dragon Softball season started Tuesday the 28th with the first conference game against Northern State. The team fell to its opponents, but takes on Bemidji State this Saturday in an away game.

For more information on Dragon Athletics, team schedules, and rosters visit http://msumdragons.com/

 

 

 

 

 

 

What do you need to graduate? DARs, LASC goals, and upper division credits

Now that you have started your journey along the college path it’s important to know what you need to get yourself to graduation. As a general guideline it is best to follow your DARs, or Degree Audit Report, which can be found on eServices. This degree audit report divides the requirements needed for your major of choice into easy to understand pieces. An example of this could be major requirements that are divided into the core requirements or classes you need to achieve your major, required electives, and your general courses.

If you go into your eServices page and click Grades and Transcripts, the following page will pop up. Click the tab that’s circled in blue to access your DARs.

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LASC stands for Liberal Arts and Sciences Curriculum. These are mandatory to make sure the university turns out well rounded students.  There will also be a degree audit report for all of your general courses, or LASC goals under the DARs tab. It’s called the  MINNESOTA TRANSFER CURRICULUM (MnTC). In this report you will find that there are different sections.  The eleven sections listed on this report are goal areas that needs to be fulfilled in order to obtain your degree. If it’s green, your good. If it’s red, contact your advisor to help you fill those credits.

Another thing to consider is your major’s requirement for upper division classes or classes that are 3oo level or above. Your 3oo+ classes can be started as early as your second semester of your freshman year. Upper division classes tend to be more intense and have a larger content base to them. A few can be used to satisfy your writing intensive LASC goal as well.

For the RN-to-BSN program you need a total of 40 credits that are in the 300+ range. 31 of these credits are fulfilled by mandatory program classes as well as the writing requirements. Some students already come into MSUM with the other 9 credits from a past institution while others need to find a few classes here.

The link below has a sample document of what the advisors will fill out with you to see how far into your degree you are. This sheet is specific for the RN-to-BSN program.

Advising Form SAMPLE

New Student Checklist Walk Through/Explanation

Congratulations on your admittance to MSUM! There is lots to do during and before your first day of class.  There is a well made web page here that has all of these steps nicely laid out in the order that you should do them. (I’ve embedded links to several websites and pages that are useful. Save this page so you can remember what to check and where.)

The first thing you need to do is get yourself a StarID. Make sure you remember what it and your password are. You will need this often on campus and on several websites. There are several ways to activate your ID, but the most common way is to enter your tech ID. When you were admitted to MSUM they gave you a 8 digit code, your tech ID. Look back through any paperwork or emails we have sent you to find this number.

The second thing you need to do is complete a FAFSA. You should have done this already if you wanted money in the forms of scholarships, grants or loans. Based on need and availability, the school will give you some help.

The third step can wait for a while. You just need to sign up for a new student orientation date. At the orientation they will talk about campus life and getting involved. They will also help you register for first semester classes. Before you come to orientation, go to eservices. Click on grades and then Interactive Degree Audit Report (DARs).  This shows you if you are on track to graduate or not. It breaks down your degree and shows you what classes you still need to take.  Look through the prerequisites for the classes in your major. They may require you to take all of them in a certain order or to take one or two before the rest open up.

You also need to make a financial commitment 15 days before the start of the semester. This is just to make sure that you are serious about coming. If you fail to set up a way of paying by that deadline, you will be dropped. No housing, no classes, nothing. Do it as soon as possible.

Something that you are likely to forget is PETSA training. This is a short course on sexual violence you have to take at the beginning of the year. You cannot take it before the start of the school year, so don’t forget before then.It can be found in D2L Brightspace under course (more on D2L later) .

This part is important. Some students don’t realize they got a new school email and miss homework assignments, labs or lectures. I didn’t know about it, so I didn’t know that my first two weeks of a class had been canceled, causing a lot of unnecessary stress. Check your Dragon Email often, about twice a day if your a good student. Teachers can keep you in the loop this way.

If you are a veteran or a family member is, you need to contact the Veteran’s resource center. There are several benefits that you may be eligible for.

This next step is optional and new. If you want to be called a different name, you can have your name changed in the school’s system and on your ID. This may be because a student has a nickname or alternate name they prefer. This helps the student get called that name consistently and to make the campus a more inclusive space.

This next part bites. You need to find and buy your textbooks. At this website click the buy that is highlighted in red. If you got there early enough, there is an option for pick-up ordering. Do that. It’s so much easier. If you didn’t make there in time, find the red link underneath the large red text that says you missed the pick-up option. Open up a second window at this point and go to eservices again. Click courses and registration and then the tab review my schedule.  Now in the bookstore tab you can look up the text books you need using the information from the eservices page (subject, #, and instructor). Write down all of the books you need. IF you didn’t select pick-up, you’ll need to do it yourself. The textbook store is located beneath the bookstore in MacLean Hall. If you’re lucky the prices will be low. If you’re not, you’ll get hit by two or three $300 textbooks for one semester.

One last thing the school is going to spring on you is that you need to submit your immunization records. It used to be on the checklist, but they removed it for now. Go here to fill it out. If that link doesn’t work, click here and then the link online immunization forms.

 

 

Advising has started!!! Registration Windows start opening on March 27th for Fall 2017!!!

Have you registered for Fall and Summer classes yet? The available seats will be filling up fast! Get registered early to avoid having to stay an extra semester just because you held off registering for a week. Go to the link here and get started!

When registering for classes your Degree Audit Report (DARS) will be very helpful. This is available through the eServices site by selecting “Grades and Transcripts” then the “Interactive Degree Audit Report” tab. This report is tailored to each student and provides a list of all necessary and completed coursework. Make sure you’re on track to have all your LASC (pronounced la-sk). Don’t push them all until the end, or you could be in trouble.

Once you are ready to begin the class search, click on “Courses and Registration,” then “Search for a Course.” Here you can search through various course offerings in a variety of subjects and pick the classes you want to sign up for. There is also the option to search for courses by tittle or specific class ID. This method is most helpful when you know which classes you are in need of to fulfill graduation requirements.  After you’ve found the class for you, click on the plus sign to the left of the class tittle. Completing this action will add the course to your wishlist for later registration . After clicking the add button, you can go to “Review My Plan” under “Courses and Registration” to see the items that have been added to your wishlist. From here, select the courses you want to take and click “Proceed to Register”.

When thinking about registering, do you want to take Summer courses? They are a great way to get ahead or catch up in a short amount of time, but register early. They are only offered based on interest. So just because you held off on signing up by a week or two, that class could be dropped and you’ll have to take it in the Fall or Spring.

After this step, you will need to input your access code. To get this code you must contact your advisor to discuss you options and graduation requirements. The last step is to put in your star ID password and click the button to complete registration. If any course conflicts exist you will be notified during this process. If you are unable to solve this problem or have any questions please contact your advisor directly or the School of Nursing and Healthcare Leadership at nursing@mnstate.edu.

To begin searching for courses visit this link: https://webproc.mnscu.edu/registration/search/basic.html?campusid=072&_ga=1.105872963.177862644.1355849320

To review general program requirements visit this link: https://www.mnstate.edu/academics/collegesdepartments.aspx

Deadliest Enemy: Our War Against Killer Germs by Michael Osterholm

Join us this Thursday night (23rd) for a presentation featuring the internationally recognized figure Michael Osterholm. Osterholm was a co-author for the book Deadliest Enemy: Our War Against Killer Germs. During the presentation he will be talking about several threats and topics concerning the public such as:

  • the reality and emergence of antibiotic resistant bacteria
  • bio terrorism as a certainty
  • the increasing risk of a devastating influenza pandemic

After the event he will be having a book signing event. The presentation will be in Langseth Hall 104 at 7 pm on campus.

 

World Down Syndrome Awareness Day March 21st 2017

Today was chosen as a symbolic day to represent the Down Syndrome. Taking place on the 21st day of the 3rd month, it represents the triplication of the 21st chromosome. Today was meant as a day for people all around the world to learn about this connecting disorder. Down syndrome has been present in all cultures and societies around the world for millennia.

The goal of having this awareness day every year is to bring about a change be fully and equally included in society for everyone that is affected by Down Syndrome. Not all governmental bodies recognize the needs or help that those affected may need. Several key areas that people around the world are trying to change through advocacy are “health, education, work and employment, standard and choice of living accommodation, participation in political, public and cultural life and access to justice and recognition before the law.”

It is estimation of incidence is about 1 in every 700 births world wide. Approximately 6,000 babies are born that are affected by this chromosome disorder in the United States. About a quarter of a million families in the US that are affected by Down Syndrome.

The CDC and WHO have recognized that are several illnesses or health problems that are more likely to occur in someone that has Down Syndrome.

  • Hearing loss (up to 75% of people with Down syndrome may be affected)
  • Obstructive sleep apnea, which is a condition where the person’s breathing temporarily stops while asleep (between 50 -75%)
  • Ear infections (between 50 -70%)
  • Eye diseases (up to 60%), like cataracts and eye issues requiring glasses
  • Heart defects present at birth (50%)

There are several tests that are available to detect if a child has Down syndrome before birth and directly after birth. While there is no treatment available, there are certain therapies and groups that work towards helping affected people move to their full intellectual and physical capabilities.

https://worlddownsyndromeday.org/united-nations-resolution-world-down-syndrome-day

http://www.un.org/en/events/downsyndromeday/background.shtml

https://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/birthdefects/downsyndrome.html

http://www.downsyndrome.org.za/images/wdsd-logo-large (2).jpg

Click to access WDSD%202017%20Campaign%20Toolkit.pdf

https://worlddownsyndromeday.org/wdsd-2017

 

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March 2017 is Self-Injury Awareness Month

Self injury month

This month long observation is recognized in the United States, Canada, and Western Europe. In the U.S. alone there are 2 million cases of self-injury reported annually, mostly among youth. It’s time to end the stigma of self-harm.

Self injury is any deliberate, non-suicidal behavior that inflicts injury on one’s body. Although self injury is not a suicidal behavior if the emotional trauma that causes one to self-harm continues it can lead to suicidal thoughts or actions. People often self harm as a way to confront emotional pain. When most people think of self-harm they often think of cutting, but there are many other forms. Actions such as burning, scratching, consuming harmful products such as bleach, pulling out clumps of hair, bruising, and breaking bones are all forms of self-injury. Self-injury is a coping mechanism and is seen as another way to deal with the emotional pain that many experience, but have difficulty handling or processing. Self-injury occurs across all ages, genders, races, and beliefs. If you know someone who self injures reach out to them and follow the tips below to do so successfully.

DON’T

  1. Get angry or show disgust. Negativity alienates and ultimatums only drive the person away from you.
  2. Deny the problem. It’s not the person’s problem or just one of his/her ‘things’. It’s not a fad, social statement or a phase he/she will grow out of.
  3. Hide sharp objects. If the person wants to self-injure, he/she will find a way.
  4. Judge the severity of the injury as an indicator of the level of emotional pain. A severely depressed person might only have scratches instead of cuts.
  5. Assume the person is okay once in treatment. Recovery from self-injury can take months, maybe even years.

DO

  1. Stay calm. Freaking out won’t solve anything. It will just close all lines of communication.
  2. Talk. Be non-judgmentally supportive. Ask “Why are you doing this to yourself?”
  3. Take the problem seriously. It’s not about attention-seeking or a growing pain.
  4. Seek treatment. Accompany the person to the doctor or counselor but don’t be pushy about privacy.
  5. Find the triggers. Focus on the underlying problems rather than just the injury.
  6. Trust the person. Self-injury is just a small part of the person.

It’s time to end the stigma of self-injury and help those who self-injure. Visit the links below for more resources on helping individuals and how to end the stigma.

http://selfinjury.com/

Sources: http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/terezia-farkas/self-injury-awareness-month_b_6810634.html  http://selfinjury.com/

Applications for RN-to-BSN Fall 2017 are due tomorrow (March 15th)

Applications for the Fall 2017 RN to BSN Program are due tomorrow, March 15th.

To begin, students need to apply to Minnesota State University Moorhead, and then apply to the School of Nursing and Healthcare Leadership. You can apply to the nursing program while your application to MSUM is being processed.

Applicants to this program must be a licensed RN or eligible for licensure by the time the program starts. In order to be considered for the RN to BSN program, a 2.75 or higher  overall GPA is required.

The following link gives more information about the RN to BSN application and admission process: https://www.mnstate.edu/snhl/bsnadmission.aspx

Another great resource for more information is provided by Dr. Barbara Matthees, Chair of the School of Nursing and Healthcare Leadership. In this video, she will provide answers to frequently asked questions.

http://coursecast.mnstate.edu/Panopto/Pages/Viewer.aspx?id=008f09bc-62fb-4eea-bedf-f376efcd18f0&_ga=1.165124735.177862644.1355849320

Feel free to contact the School of Nursing and Healthcare Leadership for any additional questions by calling (218)-477-2693, or email nursing@mnstate.edu or snhlsa@mnstate.edu. Our office is located at Lommen 213 for those that wish to visit.

Protect yourself. National Women and Girls HIV/AIDS Awareness Day 2017

Every year 40,000 people are formally diagnosed with HIV. Currently there is an estimated 1.2 million people living with HIV. The number that should be getting diagnosed is actually much higher, as 13-20% of the 1.2 million are unaware that they are infected.

What most people don’t know about HIV is that there are three stages, AIDS being one of them.

  • Acute infection. About 2-4 weeks after being infected, the individual will suffer many flu symptoms in addition to severally swollen glands and a borderline headache/migraine. Many people describe this stage as the worst flu of their life. The individual can transmit the virus to others as soon as 2 weeks after being infected.
  • Latency. After this the virus goes into hiding. It will continue to multiple at low levels in your blood. There will be no visible symptoms, and this stage can last anywhere from a few months to decades. The individual can still transmit the virus to others at this stage.
  • AIDS. The individual’s immune system crashes. It allows them to be easily infected by another infection. The life expectancy once you get to this stage is under 3 years. The individual is still contagious until the very end.

There are medications that can be taken to slow the rate or chances of one’s latency from progressing to AIDS, like ART (Antiretroviral Therapy). Two other drugs have recently come onto the market. PrEP and PEP (pre-exposure prophylaxis and post-exposure prophylaxis) work as precautionary measures to decrease the likelihood of infection. PrEP can be taken daily for as long as you are at risk and PEP can be taken after an encounter where you believe you were exposed. They work to lower the likelihood of infection by as much as 97%.

There are several things that one can do to lower their chances of infection.

  • Where a male/female condom during every sexual encounter. This includes oral and anal as well as vaginal. HIV is transmitted through blood, semen, pre-seminal fluids, rectal fluids and vaginal fluids. A condom decreases the chances that one will come in contact with one of these mediums. Women are even more likely to be infected during vaginal sex then their male counterparts. The infected semen has a large surface area to come in contact with and can remain in the vagina for several days, increasing the risk.
  • Be treated for other STDs. More so then men, women increase their chances of HIV by having by having another STD. The other STD lowers any barriers the body may have making it easier for the virus to get in.
  • Avoid injectable drugs. By sharing needles or using needles of unknown history, you may be contaminating yourself with infected blood.
  • Avoid the misuse of alcohol and drugs. These cause impairments in your decision making abilities. Doing so may decrease the chance of using a condom or increase the chance of using a needle.
  • Be monogamous. If that is not an option, talk to your sexual partners about their history. If someone is unsure of their status, have them get tested. For now, under Obamacare you can get tested for free.
  • Take PrEP. It may be expensive, but this preemptive move may save you more than what you would spend if you did contract HIV.
  • Take PEP. If something happens and you think you might have been exposed, begin taking the necessary doses of PEP within 72 hours of the contact.

There are also several threats that only effect women. This awareness day works to bring attention to both the above facts and these. Women are more likely to be the victims of sexual abuse.People that have histories of abuse are more likely to not go in for testing. They are also less likely to receive treatment for HIV if they are already positive. The abuse itself might give frequent exposure to the virus.

Women are also able to transmit the virus to their children through breastfeeding. Mothers are warned to not breastfeed their babies and to find a local breast milk bank or to use a formula. If the mother does, the chances of the baby becoming infected decreases to less than 1%.

For more information visit www.womenshealth.gov.

Sources:

https://www.womenshealth.gov/nwghaad/about-national-women-and-girls-hivaids-awareness-day

https://www.womenshealth.gov/nwghaad/what-every-girl-needs-know-about-hiv-and-aids

https://www.womenshealth.gov/hiv-and-aids/hiv-prevention

https://www.aids.gov/hiv-aids-basics/hiv-aids-101/statistics/

https://www.aids.gov/hiv-aids-basics/just-diagnosed-with-hiv-aids/hiv-in-your-body/stages-of-hiv/

https://www.womenshealth.gov/nwghaad/what-every-woman-needs-know-about-hiv-and-aids